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Post-Freudian Psychological Theories

  • Susan L. DeHoff
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter presents four additional psychological theories with regard to their approach to interpreting experiences as psychotic and/or mystical religious. It includes object relations, cognitive behavioral, transpersonal, and phenomenological definitions and descriptions of psychosis and mystical religious experience (MRE).

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan L. DeHoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Boston UniversityBostonUSA

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