Advertisement

Some Aspects on On-Road Aerodynamics

  • Thomas Schütz
  • Hannes Vollmer
Conference paper

Abstract

The aerodynamics of modern day passenger cars are usually developed under constant and reproducible conditions in a wind tunnel. However, spontaneously occurring wind changes during on-road drive are of significant interest. Recently, BMW AG has been able to develop virtual methods enabling the investigation of such spontaneous on-road driving events. These methods have been used to assess driving in slipstream, cornering and the impact of naturally occurring wind gusts. During slipstream driving, a noticeable drag-reducing effect was found for a passenger vehicle behind a truck and behind different sized passenger cars. There was a significant effect on vehicle lift. Cornering conditions were examined by only changing the curvature of the streamlines in the flow field. Simulation results indicate a significant change on vehicle coefficients compared to straight line driving. Lastly, the flow in gusty wind conditions was investigated. Simulation results confirmed results from academic wind tunnel measurements. An increase in the aerodynamic yaw moment was found under transient oncoming flow conditions compared to the quasi-steady inflow. Overall, the results from the three investigated driving conditions have a significant relevance of the aerodynamic effects under real driving conditions.

Notes

Acknowledgement

Many thanks go to Elisabeth Huber [3], Markus Geisenhofer [2] and Jose Pabon Andrade [5], who helped to investigate the above mentioned aerodynamic phenomena during their time as master and bachelor students at BMW.

References

  1. 1.
    Duncan, B., Gargoloff, J., Alajbegovic, A.: On-road aerodynamic efficiency under realistic transient wind conditions. Exa Corporation White-Paper, Burlington MA, USA (2014)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Geisenhofer, M.: Aufbau einer Simulationsmethode zur Bewertung von instationärer Aerodynamik. Master-Arbeit, TU Darmstadt (2015)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Huber, E.: Untersuchungen zum Interferenzwiderstand bei Kolonnenfahrt von Kraftfahrzeugen. Bachelor-Arbeit, TH Ingolstadt (2015)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kopp, S., Frank, T.: Nutzfahrzeuge. In: Schütz, T. (Hrsg.) Hucho – Aerodynamik des Automobils. 6. Auflage. Springer Vieweg, Wiesbaden (2013). ISBN: 978-3-8348-2316-8Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Pabon Andrade, J.: Aerodynamische Analyse von Pkw bei Kurvenfahrt. Bachelor-Arbeit, TU München (2016)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Schütz, T.: Fahrzeugaerodynamik – Basiswissen für das Studium. 1. Auflage. Springer Vieweg, Wiesbaden (2016). ISBN: 978-3-658-12817-3Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Schütz, T.: WLTP – On the increased importance of aerodynamics and impact on development procedures. In: Documentation Volume 1. 16th Stuttgart International Symposium, Stuttgart (2016)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Schütz, T., Grün, N., Blumrich, R.: Numerische Methoden. In: Schütz, T. (Hrsg.) Hucho - Aerodynamik des Automobils. 6. Auflage. Springer Vieweg, Wiesbaden (2013). ISBN: 978-3-8348-2316-8Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Schütz, T., Klußmann, R., Neuendorf, R.: Automobile Aerodynamik 2020. ATZ - Automobiltechnische Zeitschrift Ausgabe Nr.: 2016-12Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Schütz, T., Krüger, L., Lentzen, M.: Luftkräfte und deren Beeinflussung an Personenkraftwagen. In: Schütz, T. (Hrsg.) Hucho – Aerodynamik des Automobils. 6. Auflage. Springer Vieweg, Wiesbaden (2013). ISBN: 978-3-8348-2316-8Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Stoll, D., Kuthada, T., Wiedemann, J., Schütz, T.: Unsteady aerodynamic vehicle properties of the DriveAer model in the IVK model scale wind tunnel. In: 10th FKFS Conference, Stuttgart (2015)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Wordley, S., Saunders, J.: On-road Turbulence: Part 2. SAE Technical Paper Series, No. 2009-01-0002 (2009)Google Scholar
  13. 13.

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BMW AGMunichGermany

Personalised recommendations