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Explaining the Crime Drop I: Developing a Case Study of Political Change in England and Wales

Chapter
Part of the Critical Criminological Perspectives book series (CCRP)

Abstract

The chapter applies the insights gained from Chap.  2 to start to sketch a more in-depth account of the causes of both the increase in crime rates and the crime drop as experienced in England and Wales in the 1980s and 1990s. I explore four areas of policy change, namely the economy, housing, social security and schooling policies, arguing that each of these was associated with an increase in crime or an increase in the popular awareness of crime as a social problem.

Keywords

Social and economic policies Crime policies Crime trends Thatcherism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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