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Hue, Brightness & Saturation in Classical Greek Chroma Terms

  • Ekai TxapartegiEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Synthese Library book series (SYLI, volume 388)

Abstract

The Universals and Evolution model in cross-language color naming systems (Berlin B, Kay P, Basic color terms. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1969) predicted that Classical Greek chroma terms should have referred to hue regions of the color space. In this article, I propose an original reading of the Plato’s Timaeus (67c68d) that provides additional support to that prediction. It also shows that he was well aware of the distinction between saturation, brightness and hue.

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English

  1. 1. Taylor, T. (1793). Plato: 5 Dialogues, London: R. Wilks, 1804. (Translation of: Plato, Timaeus)Google Scholar
  2. 2. Davis, H. (1849). The Works of Plato. Vol. II, London: George Bell and Sons. (Translation of: Plato, Timaeus)Google Scholar
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  9. 9. Osborne, H. (1968). ‘Colour Concepts of the Ancient Greeks’. British Journal of Aesthetics, 8.3, 269–283Google Scholar
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  13. 13. Struycken, P. (2003). Color Mixtures According to Democritus and Plato. Mnemosyne, 56.3, 273–305Google Scholar

Spanish

  1. Samaranch, F. P. (1988). en Platón: Obras Completas, Madrid: Aguilar, 1127–79. (traducción de: Platón, Timeo)Google Scholar
  2. Lisi, F. (1992). Diálogos: vol. VI, Madrid: Ed. Gredos. (traducción de: Platón, Timeo)Google Scholar
  3. Eggers Lan, C. (1999). Buenos Aires: Ed. Colihue. (traducción de: Platón, Timeo)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Basque Country (UPV-EHU)LejonaSpain

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