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Speech and Its Silent Partner: Gesture in Communication and Language Learning

  • Hanna KomorowskaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Second Language Learning and Teaching book series (SLLT)

Abstract

Speaking is inherently connected with silence and gesture. The chapter looks into the evolutionary processes operating during the emergence of language in order to identify types of mutual relationships between gesture and speech with special emphasis on approaches to gesture in the history of research on non-verbal and verbal communication as well as on the implications of gestural hypotheses for present-day views on interaction. Types of gestures as well as their role in communicating affiliation or disaffiliation and in fulfilling persuasive functions are also analyzed with a view to resolving the dilemma of whether it is justified to explicitly teach non-verbal behaviour in the language classroom. Implications for designing tasks aiming to encourage non-verbal signals and raise learners’ awareness of the way they engage in interactive activities are sought.

Keywords

Language teaching Language learning Speaking Gesture Gestural hypothesis Communication FL classroom 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SWPS University of Social Sciences and HumanitiesWarsawPoland

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