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How to Deal with Applications in Foreign Language Learning and Teaching (FLLT)

  • Maria DakowskaEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Second Language Learning and Teaching book series (SLLT)

Abstract

As a technical term, applications are understood as results of pure research useful in optimizing the phenomenon under investigation. The sources and strategies of deriving useful, that is, applicable, knowledge in the field of FLLT are a serious challenge at present in view of the fact that English is a global language taught professionally in our educational system on a mass scale. Professional activity on a mass scale must have solid, that is, scientific bases. So far, although the problem of applications in the field of FLLT has a fairly long history, satisfactory solutions have yet to be developed. The manner in which the problem has been posed or contextualized, conceptualized and addressed, has evolved in the past decades. Characteristically, both the nature of the relationship between the providers and the recipients of applications as well as their status have changed. In the chapter, I highlight the main stages in this development and argue that at present a qualitatively different approach to applications in FLLT is needed.

Keywords

Applied linguistics Applications in foreign language learning and teaching Empirical discipline 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of WarsawWarsawPoland

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