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Civil War as Development in Reverse or a Case of Historical Amnesia?

  • David Maher
Chapter
Part of the Rethinking Political Violence book series (RPV)

Abstract

This Chapter presents a review of the literature that discusses the economic impacts of civil war. This chapter identifies what it calls a ‘prominent set of studies within the civil war literature’, a body of scholarship that highlights (inter alia) the negative economic consequences of civil war violence. An often-cited dictum is discussed: The idea that ‘civil war represents development in reverse’. The critiques of this position are then presented. In particular, critics argue that the ‘development in reverse’ logic is underpinned by a liberal interpretation of war and development, an interpretation that suffers from historical amnesia. Development has often been underpinned by violence, critics argue, which continues in many parts of the world today and leads to acute suffering for millions of people.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Maher
    • 1
  1. 1.Lecturer in International RelationsUniversity of SalfordSalfordUK

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