Mobility and Aesthetico-Cultural Cosmopolitanism

  • Vincenzo Cicchelli
  • Sylvie Octobre
Chapter
Part of the Consumption and Public Life book series (CUCO)

Abstract

The globalization of cultural consumption is inseparable from the growing emphasis placed on the value of mobility: the mobility of cultural products and imaginaries, but also the mobility of individuals and populations as a whole, of entire societies grappling with powerful translational processes that attempt to eliminate their borders. This chapter reveals multiple and contrasting links between aesthetico-cultural cosmopolitanism and a sense of belonging, and real or imagined forms of mobility. Perhaps surprisingly, aspirations to mobility appear to have a greater impact than actual experiences of mobility on one’s degree of openness to alterity through aesthetico-cultural cosmopolitanism. Finally, a sense of national belonging is, in fact, the most favourable to openness, while sub-national affiliations at the local level make openness more difficult.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincenzo Cicchelli
    • 1
  • Sylvie Octobre
    • 1
  1. 1.GEMASSCNRS/University of Paris-SorbonneParisFrance

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