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Negotiating the Intimate and the Professional in Mom Blogging

  • Katariina Mäkinen
Chapter
Part of the Dynamics of Virtual Work book series (DVW)

Abstract

Contemporary mom blogging is a digital practice that relies on telling everyday stories of one’s personal and family life. The increasing commercialisation of the lifestyle blogosphere means that blogging can be recognised as a form of freelance work and an option especially for those mothers of small children who strive to combine at-home mothering with different forms of micro-entrepreneurship. This chapter investigates practices of mom blogging in Finland. To address the ‘new normal’ of blogging, the chapter investigates how the complexities of blogging, such as the monetisation of everyday life, the construction of public displays of subjectivity, and the dissolving of parenting into work and vice versa, are negotiated by the bloggers themselves as an everyday part of living, working, and parenting.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katariina Mäkinen
    • 1
  1. 1.Gender StudiesUniversity of TampereTampereFinland

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