South Africa’s Economic State Apparatuses

  • Simone Claar
Chapter
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

The chapter discusses the different roles of the economic state apparatus and their power in economic and trade policy. The National Treasury, the Presidency and the Department of Trade and Industries were shaped for more than a decade through personal relations. The chapter shows the changes and also the roles of other state apparatuses, like the Department of International Relations and Cooperation. Further arenas of debate are the New Economic Development and Labour Council and the parliament. Besides the state apparatuses, three trade policy think tanks shape the South African trade policy. These are the Trade and Law Centre, the South African Institute of International Affairs and Trade and Industrial Policy Strategies.

References

  1. Bond, Patrick. 2003. Against Global Apartheid. South Africa Meets the World Bank, IMF and International Finance. London: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  2. ———. 2005. Elite Transition. From Apartheid to Neoliberalism in South Africa. 2nd ed. Scottsville: University of KwaZulu-Natal Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bonorchis, Renee. 2017. Treasury Working to Fix Country’s Economic ‘Mess’, June 25. Bloomberg. https://www.moneyweb.co.za/news/south-africa/treasury-working-to-fix-countrys-economic-mess/. Accessed 25 June 2017.
  4. Butler, Anthony. 2009. Political Poker at Expense of Treasury. Business Day, November 2. http://allafrica.com/stories/200911020120.html. Accessed 6 Sep 2013.
  5. ———. 2010. The African National Congress under Jacob Zuma. In New South African Review 1: 2010: Development or Decline? ed. John Daniel, Prishani Naidoo, Devan Pillay, and Roger Southall, 164–183. Johannesburg: Wits University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Calland, Richard. 2006. Anatomy of South Africa. Who Holds the Power? Cape Town: Zebra Press.Google Scholar
  7. Claar, Simone. 2017. Handels- und Wirtschaftspolitik: Anpassung an den globalen Kapitalismus. In Das politische System Südafrikas, ed. Dana de la Fontaine, Franziska Müller, Claudia Hofmann, and Bernhard Leubolt. Wiesbaden: Springer.Google Scholar
  8. Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). n.d.-a. Trade and Investment South Africa (TISA). Department of Trade and Industry. http://www.thedti.gov.za/about_dti/tisa.jsp. Accessed 27 Sep 2013.
  9. ———. n.d.-b. International Trade and Economic Development Division (ITED). Department of Trade and Industry. https://www.thedti.gov.za/about_dti/ited.jsp. Accessed 27 Sep 2013.
  10. ———. n.d.-c. About the DTI: Minister Rob Davies. Department of Trade and Industry. http://www.thedti.gov.za/about_dti/minister.jsp. Accessed 22 Sep 2013.
  11. ———. 2010. A South African Trade Policy and Strategic Framework. Department of Trade and Industry. http://www.dti.gov.za/trade_investment/export_publications.jsp?year=&subthemeid=26. Accessed 17 Feb 2012.
  12. DIRCO. 2013. “About the Department.” Department of International Relations and Cooperation. Accessed September 06, 2013. http://www.gov.za/department/index.html.
  13. Donnelly, Lynley. 2015. Zuma Appoints Pravin Gordhan as Finance Minister. Mail and Guardian, December 13. http://mg.co.za/article/2015-12-13-zuma-appoints-pravin-gordhan-as-finance-minister. Accessed 23 Dec 2016.
  14. Draper, Peter. 2007. Consultation Dilemmas: Transparency versus Effectiveness in South Africa’s Trade Policy. In Process Matters. Sustainable Development and Domestic Trade Transparency, ed. Mark Halle and Robert Wolfe, 241–264. Winnipeg: International Institute for Sustainable Development.Google Scholar
  15. Draper, Peter, Tsidiso Disenyana, and Gilberto Biacuana. 2010. South Africa. In Governments, Non-State Actors and Trade Policy-Making: Negotiating Preferentially or Multilaterally? ed. Ann Capling and Peter Low, 249–283. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. England, Andrew. 2015. Finance Minister Sacking Undermines South Africa’s Reputation. Financial Times [Online], December 10. https://www.ft.com/content/ef32278c-9f35-11e5-beba-5e33e2b79e46. Accessed 23 Dec 2016.
  17. GCIS. n.d.-a. Trevor Andrew Manuel. Department of Communications. http://www.gcis.gov.za/content/resourcecentre/profiles/profile/1041. Accessed 22 Sep 2013.
  18. ———. n.d.-b. Mandisi Bongani Mabuto Mpahlwa. Department of Communications. http://www.gcis.gov.za/content/resourcecentre/profiles/profile/1053. Accessed 22 Sep 2013.
  19. Hartzenberg, Trudi. 2003. Ten Year Presidential Review. Review of Trade and Investment Negotiations. Draft Report. http://www.thepresidency.gov.za/docs/pcsa/irps/thartzenburg.pdf. Accessed 5 Aug 2014.
  20. ———. 2009. Tralac Briefing, for the Parliament Committee on Trade and Industry on International Trade Agreements, Southern African Customs Union, Trade Protection & Policy, Minutes, Parliamentary Monitoring Group, August 24. http://www.pmg.org.za. Accessed 11 Dec 2014.
  21. ———. 2013. Tralac Briefing, for the Parliament Committee on Trade and Industry South Africa’s Trade Agreements and Relations: Workshop, Minutes and Presentation. Parliamentary Monitoring Group, August 1. http://www.pmg.org.za. Accessed 11 Dec 2014.
  22. Hirsch, Alan. 2005. Season of Hope. Economic Reforms Under Mandela and Mbeki. Scottsville: University of KwaZulu-Natal Press.Google Scholar
  23. Houston, Gregory. 2001. Interest Group Participation and Democratization: The Role of the National Economic Development and Labour Council. In Empowerment Through Economic Transformation, ed. Meshack Khosa, 137–174. Cape Town: HSRC Press.Google Scholar
  24. IDRC n.d. Who We Are. International Development Research Centre. https://www.idrc.ca/en/about-idrc. Accessed 2 Oct 2014.
  25. International Administration Trade Commission. n.d. ITAC. International Trade Administration Commission of South Africa. http://www.itac.org.za/. Accessed 6 Sep 2013
  26. Landsberg, Chris. 2012. The Jacob Zuma Government’s Foreign Policy: Association or Dissociation? Brazilian Journal of Strategy and International Relations 1 (1): 75–102.Google Scholar
  27. Malikane, Christopher. 2016. Who Is in Charge of the Economy of the Development State? The State, Economic Power and the National Development Plan. In State of the Nation, South Africa 2016: Who Is in Charge? ed. Daniel Plaatjes, Margaret Chitiga-Mabugu, Charles Hongoro, Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Nkondo Muxe, and Francis Nyamnjoh, 159–180. Cape Town: HSRC Press.Google Scholar
  28. Marais, Hein. 2001. South Africa: Limits to Change—The Political Economy of Transition. Kenwyn: UCT Press.Google Scholar
  29. Masters, Lesley. 2012. Opening the Black Box: South African Foreign Policy Making. In South African Foreign Policy Review, ed. Chris Landsbergs and Jo-Ansie van Wyk, vol. 1, 20–41. Pretoria: Africa Institute of South Africa.Google Scholar
  30. Nattrass, Nicoliand, and Jeremy Seekings. 2010. State, Business and Growth in Post-Apartheid South Africa. IPPG Discussion Paper Series 34. Manchester: Improving Institutions for Pro-Poor Growth.Google Scholar
  31. Ndletyana, Mcebisi. 2013. Policy Incoherence: A Function of Ideological Contestations? In State of the Nation: South Africa 2012–2013. Addressing Inequality and Poverty, ed. Udesh Pillay, Gerard Hagg, Francis Nyamnjoh, and Jonathan D. Jansen, 51–71. Cape Town: HSRC Press.Google Scholar
  32. Pather, Ra’eesa. 2017. Confirmed: Presidency Announces Gordhan Out, Gigaba in as Finance Minister. Mail and Guardian, March 31. https://mg.co.za/article/2017-03-31-presidency-announces-gordhan-gigaba-in-as-finance-minister. Accessed 31 Mar 2017.
  33. Pillay, Devan. 2011. The Tripartite Alliance and Its Discontents: Contesting the ‘National Democratic Revolution’ in the Zuma era. In New South African Review 2: New Path? Old Compromises? ed. John Daniel, Prishani Naidoo, Devan Pillay, and Roger Southall, 31–49. Johannesburg: Wits University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Plaut, Martin. 2012. The Uneasy Alliance. In Who Rules South Africa? Pulling the Strings in the Battle for Power, ed. Martin Plaut and Paul Holden, 3–29. Johannesburg and Cape Town: Jonathan and Ball Publishers.Google Scholar
  35. PMG. 2013. South Africa’s Trade Agreements and Relations. Workshop of the PC Trade and Industry. Parliamentary Monitoring Group, August 1. http://www.pmg.org.za. Accessed 8 Dec 2014.
  36. Poulantzas, Nicos. 1973. On Social Classes. New Left Review 78: 27–55.Google Scholar
  37. ———. 2000 [1978]. State, Power Socialism. New Edition with an Introduction by Stuart Hall. New York: Verso.Google Scholar
  38. Quintal, Angela. 2007. Erwin Not Sure of Zuma Presidency. Independent Online, March 29. http://www.iol.co.za/news/politics/erwin-not-sure-of-zuma-presidency-1.320967#.UidBzT3y0cs. Accessed 6 Sep 2013.
  39. Rashad, Cassim. 2007. Mainstreaming Trade into South Africa’s National Development Strategy. Addis Ababa: United Nations Economic Commission for Africa.Google Scholar
  40. Republic of South Africa. 1996. Constitution. Chapter 14. Republic of South Africa. http://www.info.gov.za/documents/constitution/1996/96cons14.htm. Accessed 27 Sep 2013.
  41. Roussow, Jannie. 2017. SA’s in a Recession. Here’s What that Means. Mail and Guardian, June 7, https://mg.co.za/article/2017-06-07-sas-in-a-recession-heres-what-that-means. Accessed 25 June 2017.
  42. SAANA Consulting. 2014. Saana Completes Evaluation of the Trade Law Centre NPC. Saana Consulting, July 10. http://www.saana.com/2014/07/10/saana-completes-evaluation-of-the-trade-law-centre-npc/. Accessed 2 Oct 2014.
  43. Sadie, Yolanda. 2006. Political Parties, Interest Groups and Social Movements. In Government and Politics in the New South Africa, ed. Albert Venter and Chris Landsberg, 3rd ed., 202–232. Pretoria: Van Schaik Publishers.Google Scholar
  44. SAIIA. 2007. Annual Financial Statements 2006/2007. South African Institute for International Affairs. http://www.saiia.org.za/images/stories/pubs/annual_reports/saia_financials_2006_2007.pdf. Accessed 6 Sep 2013.
  45. ———. 2012a. About SAIIA. South African Institute for International Affairs. http://www.saiia.org.za/about. Accessed 6 Sep 2013.
  46. ———. 2012b. Membership. South African Institute for International Affairs. http://www.saiia.org.za/membership. Accessed 6 Sep 2013.
  47. ———. 2014. SAIIA expertise for the 34th SADC Summit. South African Institute for International Affairs, August 14. http://www.saiia.org.za/news/saiia-expertise-for-the-34th-sadc-summit. Accessed 8 Dec 2014.
  48. ———. 2017. SAIIA Funders. South African Institute for International Affairs. http://www.saiia.org.za/General/funders. Accessed 25 June 2017.
  49. SAIIA Economic Diplomacy Programme. 2010. Trade Policy Reform Project. South African In-stitute for International Affairs, October 1. http://www.saiia.org.za/news/trade-policy-reform-project. Accessed 4 Oct 2014.
  50. Seekings, Jeremy. 2007. Who Holds Power in Post-Apartheid South Africa? CSSR Working Paper 195. Cape Town: Centre for Social Science Research.Google Scholar
  51. Southall, Roger. 2015. The Coming Crisis of Zuma’s ANC: The Party State Confronts Fiscal Crisis. Review of African Political Economy 43 (147): 73–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. ———. 2016. The New Black Middle Class in South Africa. Suffolk: James Currey.Google Scholar
  53. Terreblanche, Sampie. 2012. Lost in Transformation. Johannesburg: KMM Review Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  54. The Economist. 2017. South Africa’s President Sacks the Finance Minister in a Cabinet Reshuffle. The Economist, March 31. http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21719919-show-strength-president-desperate-control-his-partys-future-south. Accessed 24 June 2017.
  55. The Presidency. 2009a. Together Doing More and Better. Medium-Term Strategic Framework. A Framework to Guide Government’s Programme in the Electoral Mandate Period (2009–2014). http://www.thepresidency.gov.za/docs/pcsa/planning/mtsf_july09.pdf. Accessed 11 Aug 2014.
  56. ———. n.d. Overview. http://www.thepresidency.gov.za/pebble.asp?relid=2. Accessed 27 Sep 2013.
  57. ———. 2009b. Ministerial Clusters Reconfigured to Improve Coordination and Delivery. November 19. http://www.thepresidency.gov.za/pebble.asp?relid=858. Accessed 6 Sep 2013.
  58. TIPS. 2011. Annual Report 2010/2011. Arcadia: Trade and Industrial Policy Strategies.Google Scholar
  59. Tralac. n.d.-a. About Us. http://www.tralac.org/about-us/. Accessed 6 Sep 2013.
  60. ———. n.d.-b. Trade Data Analysis. http://www.tralac.org/resources/trade-data-analysis.html. Accessed 4 Oct 2014.
  61. Vavi, Zwelinzima. 2008a. Walking Through the Doors. Mail and Guardian, September 11. http://www.mg.co.za/article/2008-09-11-walking-through-the-doors. Accessed 6 Sep 2013.
  62. ———. 2008b. Ten Steps to a New Economy. Mail and Guardian, September 19. http://www.mg.co.za/article/2008-09-19-ten-steps-to-a-new-economy. Accessed 6 Sep 2013.

List of Interviews

  1. Civil servant 1 and 2, Pretoria, 05.10.2010 (recorded)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simone Claar
    • 1
  1. 1.University of KasselKasselGermany

Personalised recommendations