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Transnational Context: International Trade Relations

  • Simone Claar
Chapter
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

This chapter presents an overview of South Africa’s political and economic engagement in the global and regional multi- and bilateral trade arena. It shows how South Africa interacts in trade and trade-related bodies like the World Trade Organization, BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) and within the region. It further investigates trade relations with the European Union. For instance, the Trade, Development and Cooperation Agreement is one crucial element of trade relations between South Africa and the EU. This chapter ends with concluding remarks on the national and transnational context.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simone Claar
    • 1
  1. 1.University of KasselKasselGermany

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