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Skeletal Disarticulation, Dispersal, Dismemberment, Selective Transport

  • Diane Gifford-Gonzalez
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter offers background to contextualize the zooarchaeological research findings on butchery and selective transport presented in Chaps. 20 and 21. It surveys the “baseline” for active dismemberment by nonhuman carnivores and tool-using humans: a species’ intrinsic anatomical structure that constrains natural disarticulation, as well as the general course of disarticulation and dispersal in the hoofed mammals often encountered in archaeological sites. This chapter provides an historical review of the issues that motivated research on human decisions made during dismembering large animals and selectively discarding or transporting carcass segments. In summarizing actualistic research, it focuses on the rich and internally contentious ethnoarchaeological research with Hadza foragers, showing how it illustrates evolving predictive methods in zooarchaeology.

Keywords

Disarticulation Dispersal Dismemberment Carnivore transport Hominin transport Selective transport 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane Gifford-Gonzalez
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of CaliforniaSanta CruzUSA

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