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Gross National Happiness

  • Kent SchroederEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter outlines the multidimensional and integrated nature of Gross National Happiness (GNH) and explores its roots in a foundation of Buddhist-inspired cultural values. It argues that GNH is not only a national multidimensional development model for Bhutan but also a defining component of the image of the Bhutanese state itself, portraying an autonomous and coherent entity leading the pursuit of national happiness in partnership with Bhutanese society. Despite this image, the implementation of GNH policies is subject to the competing priorities and practices of the fragmented state and non-state governance actors involved.

Keywords

Bhutan Buddhism Cultural values Gross National Happiness State image 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Humber CollegeTorontoCanada

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