Definition and Importance of Psychosexual Care

  • Sanchia S. Goonewardene
  • Raj Persad
Chapter

Abstract

Up until recently, psychosexual problems may have been dealt with on a ‘medical basis,’ with a quantitative assessment of erectile dysfunction alone [1]. This would not have included patient self-perception, self-esteem, or involving their partner as part of the process [2]. Current studies indicate a much broader aspect needs to be taken [3]. Also included are addressing self-esteem, sexual confidence, physical impact and effect on relationships [4]. Men may also grieve as part of this process [5]. Modern psychosexual care should take that into account [6]. The area of psychosexual care needs to be further developed [7]. In conclusion, a strong psychosexual pathway can address areas of care which would otherwise cause significant issues.

Up until recently, psychosexual problems may have been dealt with on a ‘medical basis,’ with a quantitative assessment of erectile dysfunction alone [1]. This would not have included patient self-perception, self-esteem, or involving their partner as part of the process [2]. Current studies indicate a much broader aspect needs to be taken [3]. Also included are addressing self-esteem, sexual confidence, physical impact and effect on relationships [4]. Men may also grieve as part of this process [5]. Modern psychosexual care should take that into account [6]. The area of psychosexual care needs to be further developed [7]. In conclusion, a strong psychosexual pathway can address areas of care which would otherwise cause significant issues.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sanchia S. Goonewardene
    • 1
  • Raj Persad
    • 2
  1. 1.The Royal Free Hospital and UCLLondonUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.North Bristol NHS TrustBristolUnited Kingdom

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