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The Forties: A Pyramid of Taste

  • Tony StollerEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The first narrative chapter focuses on the BBC Director General William Haley’s ‘pyramid of taste’, sketches a brief prologue of classical music radio in the Twenties and Thirties, before looking in more detail at classical music in wartime Britain and at the key twentieth century inflection points for a modern approach to this genre of radio. It then considers how matters developed after the war was over, examining classical music on the Home Service and the Light Programme in the immediate interwar years, the start of the Third Programme and then the combined output in the remaining years of the decade.

Keywords

Radio Classical music BBC Classic FM Modern history Broadcasting history Contemporary culture Commercial radio 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Bournemouth UniversityPooleUK

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