Introducing Evidence-Based Trauma Treatment in Preventive Services: Child-Parent Psychotherapy

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses the use of an evidenced-based treatment, Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), in preventive child welfare services. CPP is used with young children and their caregivers who have experienced trauma, including maltreatment. The rationale and goals of the treatment, intervention modalities employed, competencies providers need to implement the model, evidence for its effectiveness, and the challenges to its implementation in a child welfare context are addressed. The chapter outlines the ways in which CPP uses the relationship as a vehicle of healing when maltreatment has disrupted healthy development, such that well-being and permanency can be achieved.

Keywords

Trauma-informed treatment Evidenced-based treatment Young child trauma treatment Child-Parent Psychotherapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tulane University School of MedicineNew OrleansUSA

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