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Restorative Justice Practices: The Restoration Model

  • Xiaoyu Yuan
Chapter
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Part of the Springer Series on Asian Criminology and Criminal Justice Research book series (SSACCJR)

Abstract

Over the past 40 years, many restorative justice programs have been developed in Western societies. In the meantime, many studies on restorative justice practices have been produced, although they have been criticized as “a mile wide but only an inch deep” (McCold, 2003, as cited in Walgrave, 2011, p. 97). To move beyond what restorative justice claims to be as presented in the previous chapter, a focus on its practices may give us a better understanding of how restoration, as a central notion, is understood in these programs. In this chapter, we begin by presenting some case examples that demonstrate how RJ is actually practiced. Then, an overview of evaluation studies is presented, which should enable us to determine the terms under which the stakeholders claim to have been restored. Bearing in mind that RJ has developed different modes of practice in different countries, a restoration model is then delineated drawing on the body of literature on the reported practices.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoyu Yuan
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Criminal JusticeShanghai University of Political Science and LawShanghaiChina

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