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Negotiating Feeling: The Role of Body Language

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Abstract

The focus of this chapter is the relation of feelings to community. Inspired by Knight (2008, 2010, 2013), the idea that belonging involves enacting bonds is explored, with a bond defined as a shared ‘attitude plus ideation’ coupling. This means that looking at how couplings are negotiated as bonds is crucial for understanding the reintegrative practice of conferencing. Accordingly, the chapter carefully considers the interaction of language and body language as far as negotiating bonds are concerned. This in turn raises the question of how to address the communities engendered by these bonding processes. Based on the work of Tann, the chapter then illustrates the operation of categorization, collectivization and spatialization devices in conferencing, and attends to the use of vocatives to flag relevant communities of feeling.

Keywords

Body Language gestureGesture couplingCoupling Arrogant Pride affiliationAffiliation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of the Arts & MediaUNSW AustraliaSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of LinguisticsUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia

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