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Community Asset Mapping as a Critical Participatory Research Method

Chapter
Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS)

Abstract

This chapter explores the use of community asset mapping as a strategy for achieving liberatory ideals. This exploration draws on one case illustration in a peri-urban Western Cape context, SCRATCHMAPS (Spiritual Capacity and Religious Assets for Transforming Community Health through Mobilizing Males for Peace and Safety). This project was located within a community-based participatory research approach, and used community asset mapping as a key strategy for community building. The chapter covers the theory and practice of asset mapping as method, discusses its application in the above context, and offers a critical account of the liberation capacities of such a method. Both successes and challenges experienced in this project are highlighted, and suggestions for how to address the ambiguities and challenges of adopting asset mapping as a critical approach to community building are offered. The authors argue that community asset mapping, guided by the values and principles of critical forms of participatory research, is a viable strategy for achieving liberatory ideals.

Keywords

asset mapping participatory methodologies South Africa community building safety and peace promotion 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful for the financial support received from the Community Engagement Programme of the National Research Foundation, and the University of South Africa’s Directorate for Community Engagement. We are also grateful to our academic partners, IRHAP, and our community partners. In particular, we appreciate the invaluable contributions of the local community research team in Erijaville who were centrally involved in all the processes and outputs linked to this project.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Social and Health SciencesUniversity of South AfricaJohannesburgSouth Africa
  2. 2.South African Medical Research Council-University of South Africa ViolenceInjury and Peace Research UnitCape TownSouth Africa
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyStellenbosch UniversityCape TownSouth Africa

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