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Exploring Participant-Led Film-Making as a Community-Engaged Method

Chapter
Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS)

Abstract

By use of a case example of a project that was conducted in collaboration with South African high school students, this chapter attempts to demonstrate the rich community-engagement potential inherent to participant-led film-making. We endeavour to illustrate the liberatory character and capacity of this vastly underutilised methodological resource by arguing that it affords young people, who generally have a diminished degree of social power and agency, especially in impoverished contexts, a space in which they can work together to harness a multimodal language that speaks to various community concerns that are pertinent to their lives. In producing and later screening the film, participants and audience members are able to perform a critical and reflective form of community-engagement. It is hoped that this chapter encourages people to grapple with the ambiguities of participant-led film-making, as well as other innovative visual methods, within their community-engaged work.

Keywords

Participatory Film-making Multimodality Community Youth 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Social and Health SciencesUniversity of South AfricaJohannesburgSouth Africa
  2. 2.South African Medical Research Council-University of South Africa ViolenceInjury and Peace Research UnitCape TownSouth Africa

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