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The Complex Process of Scaling the Integration of Technology Enhanced Learning in Mainstream Classrooms

  • Alison Clark-WilsonEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 739)

Abstract

The early optimism for how technology might transform teaching and learning practices in mainstream school classrooms has long faded in many countries around the world. Whilst early research findings suggested that this was due to obvious barriers such as access to the technology itself, more recent attempts to scale student-access have illuminated other factors and provided a more sound theoretical foundation for us to understanding the processes and products of scaling educational technology innovations. This keynote will use findings from key projects and initiatives to highlight what is being learned – and how this might inform future endeavours to realise a more 21st century curriculum.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The particular research on scaling reported in this paper was funded by the Nuffield Foundation (Award reference 91909) and it involved my close colleagues Celia Hoyles and Richard Noss. In addition, we gratefully acknowledge funding by the Li Ka Shing Foundation for the prior research that took place between 2010–13, which was an intensive collaboration between teams at the London Knowledge Lab, UCL Institute of Education and at the Center for Technology in Learning, SRI International, Menlo Park, USA.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UCL Knowledge LabUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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