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Introduction

  • Cheryl A. WilsonEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter briefly reviews the current state of Austen studies with particular attention to those works that examine her role in twenty-first century popular culture. It then sets out a critical framework that emphasizes the agency of Victorian readers and writers and highlights the ways in which they make use of Austen and her novels by actively engaging with both her biography and her works, bringing them to bear on various contemporary situations.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Stevenson UniversityStevensonUSA

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