A Tale of Two Congresses: Sex, Institutions, and Evangelicals in Brazil and Chile

  • Tyler Valiquette
  • Daniel Waring
Chapter
Part of the Global Queer Politics book series (GQP)

Abstract

While the debate over same-sex marriage has raged in both congresses, same-sex marriage was legalized by the Brazilian Supreme Court and not the Chilean Supreme Court. The chapter opens with an overview of LGBT mobilization in the two countries, demonstrating that this does not help explain policy stasis. We then study institutional variables. Both congresses contain influential conservative voting blocs, which makes passing progressive legislation challenging. Same-sex marriage was ultimately successful in Brazil through the judiciary, an avenue unavailable in Chile. Historical institutionalism demonstrates that a federalist structure was essential for same-sex marriage in Brazil, while the unitary composition of Chile provides fewer policy avenues for LGBT rights. Using Political Opportunity Structure, we then demonstrate how the judicialization of LGBT rights in Brazil led to success for same-sex marriage.

Keywords

Judicialization Political opportunity structure Historical institutionalism Brazil Chile Social movements Countermovements Religious conservatism Unitary Federal LGBT rights 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tyler Valiquette
    • 1
  • Daniel Waring
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GuelphGuelphCanada

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