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The Finite Province of Religious Meaning: Preliminary Remarks, Tension of Consciousness, and Epoché

  • Michael Barber
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Part of the Contributions To Phenomenology book series (CTPH, volume 91)

Abstract

Schutz’s finite province of religious meaning is distinctive vis-à-vis the other provinces, especially the province of scientific theory; and the religious province can be discussed with reference to the “transcendent” in order to accommodate as best as possible the pluralism of religions in the world. The six features characterizing the province of meaning of everyday life and non-pragmatic provinces of meaning, can be used to describe the religious province. In the religious province of meaning, one experiences a relaxed tension of consciousness in Bergson’s terms. One experiences less tension insofar as the transcendent, occupying an outside perspective on one’s own, accompanies one in one’s responsibility for one’s life and overcomes gaps between oneself and it and insofar as the province itself relies on passive-synthetic, symbolic appresentations through which the transcendent is given. A second feature, beyond the tension of consciousness, is the epoché, a sacred space or time, or liminal ritual, by which one withdraws from immersion in the world to discern more clearly the appresentations of the transcendent within the profane world. This epoché resembles Kierkegaard’s leap out the Hegelian synthesis, although the confinement out of which one leaps in the religious province has to do with imperatives of pragmatic mastery in everyday life.

Keywords

Finite Provinces Religious Province Appresentation Bergson Kierkegaard 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Barber
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophySaint Louis UniversitySaint LouisUSA

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