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Pragmatic Everyday Life

  • Michael Barber
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Phenomenology book series (CTPH, volume 91)

Abstract

The key form of spontaneity for everyday life is “working,” that pursuit of projects through bodily movement, centered about my self as the 0-point of all my coordinates, operating on various levels from the simplest bodily movement to higher level projects, and exercising mastery through typified patterns by which I have the recurrent sense that “I can do it again.” The pragmatic self, though, runs up against imposed relevances, such as death, ageing, or illness and other upsetting powers, events, or persons that disrupt my ability to master my situation and that require me to resort to my scheme of relevances, or intrinsic relevances, which are modified or adapted or called upon to provide interpretation in the face of such disruptions. Often to protect what they have already achieved and mastered and what is satisfying to their current relevance schemes, individuals or groups can resort to legitimate projects of “hyper-mastery,” such as constructing security mechanisms to protect against terrorism or defense-mechanisms to cope with potential personal risks. These projects of hyper-mastery can easily result in heightened and crippling anxieties or social pathologies—from which, so the rest of this book will argue—religion and humor can emancipate us.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Barber
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophySaint Louis UniversitySaint LouisUSA

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