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Introduction: An Overview of Schutz’s Work and This Work

  • Michael Barber
Chapter
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Part of the Contributions To Phenomenology book series (CTPH, volume 91)

Abstract

Alfred Schutz sought to provide philosophical foundations for Weberian sociology by articulating the structures of the sociotemporal, everyday life that any sociological explanation presupposes. With reference to this pragmatically oriented everyday life, Schutz develops his theory of multiple realities, including religion and humor, that are modifications of everyday life and that can free us from its pragmatic imperatives. A dialectic emerges in Schutz’s work insofar as the non-pragmatic finite provinces of meaning resist pragmatic everyday life and yet must rely upon it for their transmission and communication. Schutz repeatedly shows how events and experiences in everyday life upset the pragmatic anticipations of everyday life. By analyzing the non-pragmatic finite provinces of meaning of religion and humor in terms of the six features of the cognitive style of these provinces, one will be able to see their potential to emancipate.

Keywords

Finite Provinces Multiple Realities Pragmatic Imperatives Religious Province Schutz 1962b 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Barber
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophySaint Louis UniversitySaint LouisUSA

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