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International Demographic Situation and Its Linguistic Associations

  • Jacob S. Siegel
Chapter

Abstract

The size, growth, and distribution of a language are measured in terms of the number of speakers of the language, growth in these numbers, and the distribution patterns of the speakers. Hence, population size, growth, and distribution inform us regarding the past and current levels, growth, and distribution of particular languages, and projections of population size, growth, and distribution inform us as to the future size, growth, and distribution of languages. Demographic and related factors and events, such as population size, population growth, fertility, mortality, migration, geographic distribution, age-sex composition, household structure, socioeconomic status, and health conditions, have a strong influence on linguistic events. There may also be influences in the opposite direction, i.e., influences of linguistic events on demographic events. I cite below a few of the numerous examples that could be given of the path from demographic events to linguistic events.

References and Suggested Readings

Historical Context

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    (Note: The literature on the influence of literacy and education on economic, health, and family conditions is immense, and only a small selection is included in the list below.)

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacob S. Siegel
    • 1
  1. 1.North BethesdaUSA

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