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Coal

  • Philip CrowsonEmail author
Chapter
Part of the The Political Economy of the Asia Pacific book series (PEAP)

Abstract

This chapter looks at coal’s changing contribution to primary energy supplies in the Asia-Pacific Region, most notably in China. It then examines how coal’s uses in the region have evolved in recent decades and how they might change in the future, paying particular attention to steam and coking coals. Attention then moves to a discussion of the region’s domestic coal production, with a brief examination of the region's coal reserves. Although the region, as a whole, is largely self-sufficient, imports and exports in the coal trade are important. The main geographical origins and destinations of trade are described, before a discussion of the constraints, risks, and challenges faced both by domestic and foreign producers, as well as end-users of the product.

Abbreviations

BTU

British Thermal Unit

EIA

Energy Information Administration

FOB

Free on Board

GDP

Gross Domestic Product

GW

Gigawatt

IEA

International Energy Agency

MT

Million Tonnes

MTCE

Million Tonnes of Coal Equivalent

MTOE

Million Tonnes of Oil Equivalent

PPP

Purchasing Power Parity

TWH

Terrawatt Hour

UCG

Underground Coal Gasification

US

United States

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law and PolicyUniversity of DundeeDundeeUK

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