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Conclusions and Policy Implications

  • Antonio A. Romano
  • Giuseppe Scandurra
  • Alfonso Carfora
  • Monica Ronghi
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Climate Studies book series (BRIEFSCLIMATE)

Abstract

In this chapter we report some concluding remarks and policy implications. The results obtained by the analysis of the committed and disbursed flow of funds revealed a strong heterogeneity in the way the funds are being allocated by donors; however, our findings show a relationship between the amounts disbursed and greenhouse gas emissions, which is more significant with regard to the funds directed toward biosphere protection.

Our study shows that close attention should be paid to the analysis of political contexts in a broad sense. Particularly, we must focus on the international negotiations process that enables the direction of funds toward specific needs and priorities and the issue of access to electricity. For example, the difficulties that developing countries face when trying to improve their green economic development without access to carbon remain a matter of the utmost importance and urgency for many developing countries that lack significant aid from developed countries.

Keywords

Greenhouse gas Clustered data Flow of funds Green economic development Policy implications 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonio A. Romano
    • 1
  • Giuseppe Scandurra
    • 1
  • Alfonso Carfora
    • 2
  • Monica Ronghi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Management Studies and Quantitative MethodsUniversity of Naples “Parthenope”NaplesItaly
  2. 2.Italian Revenue AgencyRomeItaly

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