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Canada: The Debate About Oil and Gas Management

  • Shantel Jordison
Chapter

Abstract

Canada is a vast and geographically diverse federation where each petroleum-endowed province or territory makes its own decisions about how oil and gas is to be developed within its borders. According to this chapter, the oil and gas industry is the government’s chief partner in development, and First Nations play a central role in resource development. The Canadian civil society actors with greatest influence on the petroleum sector are companies, the media and First Nations; least influential are academia/think-tanks. Other noteworthy aspects of the Canadian oil and gas debate are the relative neutrality of the media and the growing role of social media in connecting individuals from different civil society groups to promote action for or against various oil and gas developments.

Keywords

Canada Natural resources Oil Gas Petroleum governance Civil society DemocracyAuthoritarianismFederalism Media First Nations Alberta 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shantel Jordison
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public PolicyUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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