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Fluoroscopy in Interventional Pain Management

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Abstract

Fluoroscopy has revolutionized the medical treatment of pain dating back to 1985. The ability to visualize the affected anatomy allows the interventional pain specialist to more effectively diagnose and treat chronic pain than ever before. The advances in fluoroscopic equipment have focused on how to make the image more readily viewable while minimizing the risk associated with radiation exposure for the patient, physician, and all personnel present.

Most interventional procedures in the management of chronic pain require fluoroscopic exposure only for short periods of time. Interventionalists are urged to follow the principles of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) with regard to fluoroscopic radiation, keeping it “as low as is reasonably achievable,” at all times.

Keywords

  • Interventional pain management
  • Fluoroscopy
  • Anatomy of spine
  • Needle placement
  • Radiation exposure
  • Image intensifier
  • As low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

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Acknowledgments

This book chapter is modified and updated from a previous book chapter, “Fluoroscopy in the Interventional Pain Unit: A Physician Perspective” by David M. Schultz, MD, in Interventional Techniques in Chronic Non-Spinal Pain published by ASIPP Publishing. Permission has been obtained from ASIPP Publishing.

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Schultz, D.M. (2018). Fluoroscopy in Interventional Pain Management. In: Manchikanti, L., Kaye, A., Falco, F., Hirsch, J. (eds) Essentials of Interventional Techniques in Managing Chronic Pain. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60361-2_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60361-2_9

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