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Anatomy of the Spine for the Interventionalist

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Abstract

Interventional pain physicians performing spinal injections must have a detailed understanding of the spinal anatomy in order to perform safe and effective spinal procedures. An interventionalist must learn the important aspects of the spinal anatomy as it relates to interventional pain management. Interventional pain management includes physicians from various specialties with physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians and excellent understanding of anatomy; however, they may have little experience in regional anesthesia or fluoroscopy. In contrast, anesthesiologists often begin interventional pain management with excellent tactile skills from years of performing blind injections for regional anesthesia, but may lack expertise in the understanding of fluoroscopic anatomy. Radiologists may be experts in the use of fluoroscopy and understanding of the anatomy; however, radiologists may be lacking tactile techniques of regional anesthesia. Understanding anatomy with anatomical planes, specifically spinal column, fluoroscopic anatomy with bony elements, ligaments of the spine, and discs, and the understanding of multiple compartments of the spine are essential components of interventional pain management.

Keywords

  • Interventional pain management
  • Anatomy of the spine
  • Fluoroscopic anatomy
  • Spinal column
  • Bony elements
  • Discs
  • Ligaments

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Acknowledgments

This book chapter is modified and updated from a previous book chapter, “Spinal Anatomy for the Interventionalist” by David M. Schultz, MD, in Interventional Techniques in Chronic Spinal Pain published by ASIPP Publishing. Permission has been obtained from ASIPP Publishing.

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Correspondence to David M. Schultz .

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Schultz, D.M. (2018). Anatomy of the Spine for the Interventionalist. In: Manchikanti, L., Kaye, A., Falco, F., Hirsch, J. (eds) Essentials of Interventional Techniques in Managing Chronic Pain. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60361-2_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60361-2_7

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-60359-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-60361-2

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