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Sedation for Interventional Techniques

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Abstract

Medical advances in noninvasive monitoring have made sedation safer and provided by diverse groups of clinicians in many locations. Sedation has enabled the delivery of safe care, decreased pain and suffering, and facilitated access to many complicated procedures in an outpatient setting. The majority of chronic pain patients may desire and/or require sedation. The present evidence illustrates a lack of confounding in the diagnostic ability of diagnostic facet joint nerve blocks. However, there is a paucity of literature in reference to therapeutic interventional techniques and the requirements of sedation.

Overall, complications or side effects are extremely rare or nonexistent from sedation supervised or provided by well-trained physicians. This chapter discusses sedation for interventional pain procedures with an emphasis on guidelines for safe delivery, selection of appropriate patients, patient evaluation, medications, patient monitoring, and safe discharge.

Keywords

  • Sedation
  • Moderate sedation
  • Conscious sedation
  • Sedation during pain procedures
  • Intravenous sedation
  • Sedation medications
  • Sedation safety

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Correspondence to Murali Patri .

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Patri, M., Murinova, N., Krashin, D., Kaye, A.D., Manchikanti, L. (2018). Sedation for Interventional Techniques. In: Manchikanti, L., Kaye, A., Falco, F., Hirsch, J. (eds) Essentials of Interventional Techniques in Managing Chronic Pain. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60361-2_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60361-2_5

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