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Pharmacology and Clinical Relevance of Commonly Used Drugs

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Abstract

Interventional pain medicine uses many different medications, including local anesthetics, corticosteroids, neurolytic agents, and radiocontrast media. The interventionalist must make an informed choice among the multiple alternatives in each class of medication. For some medications, the mechanisms of action are still not completely understood, and patient responses may vary due to genetic, epigenetic, and other factors in unexpected ways. Most medication decisions are based on a combination of theoretical knowledge and empirical evidence.

Keywords

  • Pharmacotherapy
  • Local anesthetics
  • Corticosteroids
  • Neurolytics
  • Radiocontrast
  • Toxicity
  • .

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Correspondence to Natalia Murinova .

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Murinova, N., Krashin, D., Kaye, A.D. (2018). Pharmacology and Clinical Relevance of Commonly Used Drugs. In: Manchikanti, L., Kaye, A., Falco, F., Hirsch, J. (eds) Essentials of Interventional Techniques in Managing Chronic Pain. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60361-2_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60361-2_3

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-60359-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-60361-2

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