Labour and the State: Corporatism and the Left, 1930–1977

  • Marieke Riethof
Chapter
Part of the Studies of the Americas book series (STAM)

Abstract

This chapter situates Brazilian labour politics in the historical context of state-led industrialization, corporatism, and authoritarianism. The Brazilian government’s interventionist industrialization policies during the mid-twentieth century contributed to the emergence of a large urban working class whose militancy opened a space for organized labour’s political role. The political arrangements that emerged in this period contained the seeds of both resistance and accommodation, while shaping Brazilian labour politics far into the future.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marieke Riethof
    • 1
  1. 1.Modern Languages and Cultures/Latin American StudiesUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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