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Developments in Relation to Primary School Leadership in Rwanda Since the Genocide of 1994

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Abstract

This chapter considers developments that have taken place in relation to primary school leadership in Rwanda since 1994. That year marked the end of the four-year civil war, which had led to the genocide that occurred throughout the country. The chapter is divided into three parts. The first part examines briefly the impact of the genocide on primary school education. The second part describes developments that have occurred in relation to primary school education more generally in Rwanda from 1994 until 2014. The third part of the chapter highlights developments related to primary school leadership during this period.

Keywords

Primary School Leadership Ministry Of Education (MINEDUC) District Education Office (DEOs) Rwandan Kinyarwanda 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationThe University of Western AustraliaCrawley, PerthAustralia

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