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Aging

  • Lieke van HeumenEmail author
  • Tamar Heller
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Child and Family Studies book series (SSCFS)

Abstract

Research on older adults with intellectual disabilities often focuses on age-related losses in functioning and on ways to prevent decline. A positive psychology perspective on aging focuses on creating a positive and meaningful aging experience. It enables the formulation of supports and services informed by the life stories, experiences, and individual needs and preferences of these adults. This chapter discusses aging among people with intellectual disabilities from a life course perspective and focuses on the major transitions faced by this population: the transition to retirement, transitions in social networks, and the final transition of death and dying. Strengths-based interventions focused on future planning, social network interventions, and life story can support adults with intellectual disabilities through these transitions.

Keywords

Aging Intellectual and developmental disabilities Positive psychology 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The contents of this article were developed with funding from the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), and National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) Grants # 90RT5020-01-00 and # 90AR5007-02-00. However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Disability and Human DevelopmentUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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