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Teaching Community Living Skills to People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

  • Raymond G. MiltenbergerEmail author
  • Heather Zerger
  • Marissa Novotny
  • Rocky Haynes
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Child and Family Studies book series (SSCFS)

Abstract

This chapter describes behavioral approaches to teaching community living skills to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Community living skills are essential for promoting independence and autonomy. After identifying relevant skills for the individual, the next step is to conduct a task analysis that identifies the sequence of component behaviors of the skills to be taught. A variety of approaches can be used to teach community living skills including, prompting strategies, computer simulation, behavioral skills training (BST), simulated environments, video modeling, video prompting, and picture prompting strategies. Each of these approaches is described and research evaluating each of these approaches is presented. The chapter concludes with step-by-step guidelines for teaching community living skills to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Keywords

Community living skills Behavioral approaches Independence Autonomy Task analysis Component behavior Prompting strategies Computer simulation Behavioral skills training Simulated environments Video modeling Picture prompting 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond G. Miltenberger
    • 1
    Email author
  • Heather Zerger
    • 1
  • Marissa Novotny
    • 1
  • Rocky Haynes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child and Family StudiesUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA

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