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Strengths-Based Approaches to Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

  • Michael L. WehmeyerEmail author
  • Karrie A. Shogren
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
  • Hatice Uyanik
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Child and Family Studies book series (SSCFS)

Abstract

The opening chapter introduced the growing field of positive psychology and provided a context within which to understand and apply strengths-based approaches to intellectual and developmental disabilities. This chapter, in turn, examines historical understandings of disability, how those impacted understandings of intellectual disability, and how changing understandings of disability are leading to strengths-based conceptualizations of intellectual disability and focusing the field on promoting the health and well-being of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Keywords

Intellectual disability Strengths-based models of disability Social-ecological models Self-determination Person–environment fit Developmental disabilities 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael L. Wehmeyer
    • 1
    Email author
  • Karrie A. Shogren
    • 1
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
    • 2
  • Hatice Uyanik
    • 1
  1. 1.Beach Center on Disability/Kansas University Center on Developmental DisabilitiesUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA
  2. 2.Medical College of GeorgiaAugusta UniversityAugustaUSA

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