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Assistive Technology

  • Giulio E. LancioniEmail author
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
  • Mark F. O’Reilly
  • Jeff Sigafoos
  • Francesca Campodonico
  • Gloria Alberti
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Child and Family Studies book series (SSCFS)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of intervention programs based on the use of assistive technology to help persons with severe/profound and multiple disabilities develop self-determination and adaptive responding so as to improve their condition, self-fulfillment, and social image. Specifically, the chapter focuses on (a) microswitch-based programs to help persons acquire/strengthen small responses to connect with their immediate environment, (b) microswitch-aided programs to help persons develop assisted-ambulation responses, (c) microswitch-aided programs to help persons increase adaptive responses and curb problem behaviors or incorrect postures, (d) programs based on the use of speech-generating devices to promote communication (requests) and related engagement, (e) programs based on technology packages providing orientation cues and stimulation to promote basic activity or assembly-task engagement and mobility, and (f) programs based on technology packages to promote contact/communication with distant partners. All the aforementioned types of programs and related technology solutions are illustrated in the chapter through detailed summaries of relevant studies published in scientific journals. The final part of the chapter presents general considerations about the studies (programs and related technologies) reviewed, analyzes the implications of the studies and their outcomes for daily contexts, and envisages some new, possible developments in the area.

Keywords

Microswitches Speech-generating devices Stimulation control Assisted ambulation Communication Adaptive responses Activity engagement Problem behavior 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giulio E. Lancioni
    • 1
    Email author
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
    • 2
  • Mark F. O’Reilly
    • 3
  • Jeff Sigafoos
    • 4
  • Francesca Campodonico
    • 5
  • Gloria Alberti
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Neuroscience and Sense OrgansUniversity of BariBariItaly
  2. 2.Medical College of GeorgiaAugusta UniversityAugustaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Special EducationUniversity of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  4. 4.School of Educational PsychologyVictoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand
  5. 5.Lega F. D’Oro Research CenterOsimoItaly

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