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Goal Setting and Attainment and Self-regulation

  • Michael L. WehmeyerEmail author
  • Karrie A. Shogren
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Child and Family Studies book series (SSCFS)

Abstract

Goal-oriented actions are critical in enabling people to act in a self-determined manner and to be causal agents in their lives. Self-regulation involves, in essence, various processes involved in attaining and maintaining goals. In this chapter, we provide a more in-depth look at self-regulation and goal-directed action using Causal Agency Theory as a framework and then examine what is known about promoting goal setting and attainment activities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Keywords

Goal setting Goal attainment Self-regulation Self-monitoring Self-instruction Self-evaluation 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of KansasLawrenceUSA

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