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Exercise, Leisure, and Physical Well-Being

  • James K. LuiselliEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series on Child and Family Studies book series (SSCFS)

Abstract

This chapter addresses behavioral teaching and support strategies for increasing exercise, expanding leisure pursuits, and improving physical well-being among people who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. The research base for each area is covered by describing several single-case and group studies conducted in natural settings. Issues of research-to-practice translation include training of care-providers, assessing intervention integrity, social validity, and telehealth technologies. The chapter emphasizes a prevention-focused and multidisciplinary approach to establishing and sustaining healthy lifestyles.

Keywords

Behavioral health Exercise Intellectual and developmental disabilities Leisure Physical well-being Positive psychology 

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© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.North East Educational and Developmental Support CenterTewksburyUSA

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