Advertisement

A New Academic Realm: Video-Game Enrols in College

  • Eduardo RoigEmail author
  • Nieves Mestre
Conference paper

Abstract

The format of video game seems revealing to explore a number of architectural phenomena: the architect is nowadays actively enrolled in the construction of interactive digital places as part of extensive multidisciplinary work teams. Originally linked to military experiments and computer labs, video game gender is rather implied on research and academic teaching-learning literature. The number of university programs considering this subject an issue beyond technological gadgets or mere entertainment has exponentially increased. The purpose of this communication is advancing in the emergence of a video games pedagogy promoting its inclusion in architecture university curricula. This paper proposes a topological analysis of the video game with a clear pedagogical intention to structure a hypothetical video game undergraduate course, preferably under the field of knowledge of design ideation and graphics.

Keywords

Videogames Architecture Gameplay Cybernetic Google glass 

References

  1. Aarseth, E. 2001. Computer game studies, Year one. Game Studies 1. Disponible en: http://gamestudies.org/0101/editorial.html (Consultada el 3 de junio de 2014).
  2. Aarseth, E. 2007. Investigación sobre juegos: aproximaciones metodológicas al análisis de juegos. Artnodes no 7, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya. Disponible en: http://artnodes.uoc.edu (Consultada el 20 de julio de 2014).
  3. Bogost, I. 2007. Persuasive games. The expressive power of videogames. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  4. Bolter, J., and R. Grusin. 2000. Remediation. Understanding new media. Cambridge: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  5. Boron, D. 2006. A short story of digital gamespace. In Space time play, eds. Von Borries F., S. Waltz, M. Böttger. Basel: Birkhäuser.Google Scholar
  6. Consalvo, M., and N. Dutton. 2007. Game analysis: development a methodological toolkit for the qualitative study of games. Artnodes, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya. Disponible en: http://artnodes.uoc.edu (Consultada el 20 de junio de 2012).
  7. DRAE: Diccionario de la Real Academia de la Lengua.Google Scholar
  8. López-Galiacho, E. 2014. Habitar lo irreal. Aproximaciones a una arquitectónica de los mundos virtuales. tesis doctoral inédita, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSAM.Google Scholar
  9. Montagnana, V. 2008. Videojuegos: Una nueva forma de cultura. Su evolución a lo largo de la historia. Barcelona: Ma Non troppo.Google Scholar
  10. Murray, J. 1997. Hamlet on the holodeck: The future of narrative in cyberspace. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  11. Orwell, G. 1949. 1984, UK: Harvill Secker.Google Scholar
  12. Roig, E. 2013. El Entorno Aumentado. Imperativo informacional para una ecología digital de lo arquitectónico. tesis doctoral inédita, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, ETSAM.Google Scholar
  13. Shannon, R.E. 1975. Systems simulation: the art and science. Englewood Cliffs, N.Y.: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  14. Von Borries, F., S. Waltz, and M. Böttger. 2007. Space time play. Basel: Birkhäuser.Google Scholar
  15. Wachowski Li., and Wachowski La. 1999. The Matrix, USA: Warner Bros.Google Scholar

Video Games

  1. Asteroids, 1979. Developed and published by Atari.Google Scholar
  2. Atari, 1972. Developed by Alcorn, A., published by Atari.Google Scholar
  3. Battlezone, 1980. Developed and published by Atari.Google Scholar
  4. Commando, 1985. Developed and published by Capcon.Google Scholar
  5. Donkey Kong, 1981. Developed and published by Nintendo.Google Scholar
  6. Don Quijote, 1987. Developed and published by Dinamic Software.Google Scholar
  7. Doom, 1993. Developed by ID Software and published by GT Interactive.Google Scholar
  8. Gauntlet, 1985. Developed and published by Atari.Google Scholar
  9. Ghost’n Goblins, 1984. Developed by Capcon and published by Capcon and Taito America.Google Scholar
  10. Kung-Fu Master, 1984. Developed and published by Irem and Nintendo.Google Scholar
  11. Little Computer People, 1985. Developed and published by Activision.Google Scholar
  12. 1942, 1984. Developed and published by Capcon.Google Scholar
  13. Pac-Man, 1980. Developed by Namco, published by Namco and Midway.Google Scholar
  14. Paperboy, 1984. Developed by Atari and published by Atari, Elite Systems and Mindscape.Google Scholar
  15. Q*Bert, 1982. Developed and published by Atari.Google Scholar
  16. Quake, 1996. Developed by ID Software and published by GT Interactive.Google Scholar
  17. SimCity, 1989. Developed by Maxis and published by Atari and EA.Google Scholar
  18. Shinobi III, 1993. Developed and published by Sega.Google Scholar
  19. Space Invaders, 1978. Developed by Taito Corporation, published by Midway.Google Scholar
  20. Super Mario Bros, 1985. Developed and published by Nintendo.Google Scholar
  21. The Oregon Train, 1974. Developed by MECC, published by MECC.Google Scholar
  22. Wii Sports, 2006. Developed and published by Nintendo.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universidad de AlcaláMadridSpain
  2. 2.Universidad Europea de MadridMadridSpain

Personalised recommendations