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An Empirical Model for Carbon Recovery in a Rotating Belt Filter and Its Application in the Frame of Plantwide Evaluation

  • Chitta Ranjan Behera
  • Farnaz Daynouri-Pancino
  • Domenico Santoro
  • Krist V. Gernaey
  • Gürkan SinEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Civil Engineering book series (LNCE, volume 4)

Abstract

The rotating belt filter (RBF) is an emerging and enabling technology for carbon recovery and also an alternative to the primary clarifier (PC), sludge thickening and dewatering. A recent study indicates that the RBF has the potential to reduce capital cost, footprint and improve energy and nutrient recovery in comparison to a conventional PC. Moreover, it is also believed that the RBF can fractionate carbon (enrichment of cellulose, namely toilet paper) based on particulate size, more efficiently than a PC. It is, therefore, necessary to understand and quantify the uniqueness of the RBF performance to maximize plant-wide benefits when retrofitted in existing wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Thus, a rigorous plant-wide study is required to interpret the deeper influence of an RBF on the major downstream units (such as activated sludge tanks, sludge digester, etc.). This study emphasizes the development of a simplified empirical model for describing carbon recovery in an RBF and the impact of the RBF implementation on plant-wide evaluation.

Keywords

Rotating belt filter Carbon recovery Empirical model Plant-wide evaluation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This project is partly funded Water Joint Programming Initiative, water challenge for a changing world waterworks 2014 confound call. Dr. Ulf Jeppsson (Lund University) is gratefully acknowledged for providing the codes of the Benchmark Simulation Model no. 2.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chitta Ranjan Behera
    • 1
  • Farnaz Daynouri-Pancino
    • 2
  • Domenico Santoro
    • 2
  • Krist V. Gernaey
    • 1
  • Gürkan Sin
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Chemical and Biochemical EngineeringTechnical University of DenmarkKongens LyngbyDenmark
  2. 2.Trojan TechnologiesLondonCanada

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