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Phosphorus Recovery from Sewage in a Pilot-Scale UASB-DHS System

  • A. Nurmiyanto
  • H. Kodera
  • T. Kindaichi
  • N. Ozaki
  • A. Ohashi
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Civil Engineering book series (LNCE, volume 4)

Abstract

The operation of a pilot-scale plant for the demonstration of phosphate (P) recovery from actual sewage was investigated for more than 5-years. The pilot plant consisted of a 500 L up flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and 540 L down flow hanging sponge (F-DHS) reactor as pre-treatment unit, subsequently a 66 L of P-DHS reactor operation was modified to enhance recovery of P. The combined UASB-DHS system could achieve good organic removal efficiencies accounted for 87%, 84% and 90% for BOD, COD, and SS respectively. Under the optimum operational condition, the P-DHS reactor was able to concentrate P up to 120 mg P L-1 in the recovery solution. Nevertheless, high P concentration could not be easily maintained over the years. It started to worsen when the pH in F-DHS effluent dropped until below 6, but then slightly increased when the pH is being controlled in a range of 7-8. Interestingly, a cyclic pattern was observed in the P concentration of the recovery solution in response to the temperature, regardless of whether the pH was controlled or not. High P concentration only achieved temporally in spring (16 < T < 20°C) and further become deteriorated as temperature rise in summer (T > 30°C). Therefore, in order to achieve a high P concentration in the recovery solution the F-DHS effluent temperature should be controlled in a range of 15–20°C.

Keywords

Down-flow hanging sponge Phosphorus recovery Polyphosphate accumulating organisms Up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket Wastewater treatment 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) as a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A). The first author also gratefully acknowledges the Indonesian Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP), the Indonesian Ministry of Finance for providing PhD scholarship.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Nurmiyanto
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Kodera
    • 1
  • T. Kindaichi
    • 1
  • N. Ozaki
    • 1
  • A. Ohashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of EngineeringHiroshima UniversityHigasihiroshimaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Environmental EngineeringIslamic University of IndonesiaYogyakartaIndonesia

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