Advertisement

Differential Expression of Genes Involved in Utilization of Benzo(a)Pyrene in Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 Strain

  • G. P. Cauduro
  • T. Falcon
  • A. L. Leal
  • V. H. Valiati
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Civil Engineering book series (LNCE, volume 4)

Abstract

Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) are recalcitrant pollutants that are among the major Petroleum by-products. Among them, benzo(a)pyrene receives special attention as it is carcinogenic and highly insoluble, being really difficult to decompose with conventional treatments. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), often use biological techniques such as activated sludge, that rely on microorganisms to degrade organic compounds. Burkholderia genus is known for its biodegradation ability and have been used as study model. Using transcripts and mRNA analyses, one can find out genomic regions and functions involved in this aptitude. In this work we used the model strain B. vietnamiensis G4 aiming to find genes that are differentially expressed in the presence of benzo(a)pyrene. Six transcriptomes where generated from each experimental unit in order to compare gene expression and infer which genes are involved in benzo(a)pyrene degradation pathways. Thirty-six genes were differentially expressed in the group exposed to benzo(a)pyrene, most of them involved in catalytic activity. The most significant genomic regions are: phenylacetic acid degradation protein paaN involved in degradation of organic compounds to obtain energy, oxidoreductase FAD-binding subunit in the regulation of electrons within groups of dioxygenase enzymes, with potential to break benzene rings, and glutamic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, a region described as responsible for the ability of phenol degradation. These candidate genes are now target to new studies aiming optimization of treatment processes.

Keywords

Polyaromatic hydrocarbons Organic pollution Persistent pollutants Transcriptome 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author would like to acknowledge Professor Eshwar Mahenthiralingam, for providing the Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 strain.

References

  1. Daims H, Taylor MW, Wagner M (2006) Wastewater treatment: a model system for microbial ecology. Trends Biotechnol 24:483–489CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Haritash AK, Kaushik CP (2009) Biodegradation aspects of Polycyclic Hydrocarbons (PAH): a review. J Hazard Mater 169:1–15CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Martin JA, Wang Z (2011) Next-generation transcriptome assembly: review. Nat Rev Genet 12:671–682CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. O’Sullivan LA, Mahenthiranlingan E (2005) Biotechnological potential within the genus Burkholderia. Lett Appl Microbiol 41:8–11CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Valentin-Vargas A, Toro-Labrador G, Massol-Deyá AA (2012) Bacterial community dynamics in full-scale activated sludge bioreactors: operational and ecological factors driving community assembly and performance. PLoS One 7:1–12CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Yan J, Wanga L, Fub PP, Yua H (2004) Photomutagenicity of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the US EPA priority pollutant list. Mutat Res 557(1):99–108CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. P. Cauduro
    • 1
  • T. Falcon
    • 1
  • A. L. Leal
    • 2
  • V. H. Valiati
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, Biology Graduate ProgramSão LeopoldoBrazil
  2. 2.Companhia Riograndense de Saneamento, Biology LaboratoryTriunfoBrazil

Personalised recommendations