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Education and the Police Professionalisation Agenda: A Perspective from England and Wales

  • Stephen Tong
  • Katja M. Hallenberg
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides selective commentary on the developments of police learning and education from 1945 to the present time. It describes the role of police services in developing skills and knowledge for officers while commenting on the gradual move to outside providers. The engagement between universities and police services in providing education for officers is described and the different approaches adopted are discussed. Finally, the chapter discusses the consultation around higher education accreditation, and the various considerations in relation to serving officers and future recruits.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Tong
    • 1
  • Katja M. Hallenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Canterbury Christ Church UniversityCanterburyUK

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