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Partnerships or Relationships: The Perspectives of Families and Educators

  • Susanne RogersEmail author
  • Sue Dockett
  • Bob Perry
Chapter
Part of the International Perspectives on Early Childhood Education and Development book series (CHILD, volume 21)

Abstract

This chapter examines the perspectives of both adult family members and educators on the establishment of partnerships as children living in complex circumstances make the transition to school. Policies and frameworks relating to the education and care of children and young people frequently identify the importance of partnerships among schools, families and communities. However, these same documents rarely consider issues of context and diversity. The study, undertaken in Australia, analysed the perspectives of family members and educators on the establishment of family-educator partnerships as a new policy relating to starting school was implemented as a state government initiative. While various national policies and local department documents identified the importance of family-educator partnerships, the expectations and aspirations of families and educators placed emphasis on relationships of mutual trust and respect.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationCharles Sturt UniversityAlbury-WodongaAustralia

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