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Reading Film: Wider Considerations

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Abstract

The children’s responses to their reading film, which did not directly inform the spiral progression framework, are explored in this chapter. They provided valuable insight into a range of issues, which I felt would be neglectful to ignore even though these findings did not further the progression model. This chapter explores the conditions for viewing films, how and where the children viewed films—the environment, the transportability of film, the impact of home-school links, the children’s emotional and physical responses to film, their questions about the history of film and further links to film production. Vocabulary progression is also an important factor if children are to fully engage with the ‘grammar of film’ (Bearne and Bazalgette, Beyond words: Developing children’s response to multimodal text. Leicester: UKLA, 2010) and is thus given separate consideration as a distinct theme.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.J H Bulman Consultancy LtdMarket RasenUK

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