The Parroting the Pariah Effect: Aggregate-Level Evidence

Chapter
Part of the Political Campaigning and Communication book series (PCC)

Abstract

In this chapter and the next, we demonstrate empirically that, on average, the strategy of parroting the pariah substantially reduces a challenger party’s electoral attractiveness. We do so in this chapter on the basis of election results of 28 parties in 15 West European countries since 1944. Just as in the following chapter, we do not find consistent empirical support for the parrot hypothesis or the pariah hypothesis. At the same time, our research produces corroborating evidence for the parroting the pariah hypothesis.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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